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How many and which ant species are being accidentally moved around the world?

Human transportation facilitates the dispersal of exotic ants, but few studies have quantified the magnitude and geography of these movements. We used several non-parametric indices to estimate the number of species successfully introduced to or established in new regions. We also compared their source biogeographic realms to assess the importance of geographical origin in determining the likelihood of establishment after introduction. Occurrence data on exotic ants derive from studies of three temperate regions. Our results suggest that the numbers of introduced or established ants may be much larger than the numbers so far documented. Ants introduced or established in new regions tend to arrive from the same or neighbouring realms, as would be expected if exotic species tend to match climates and if arrival/establishment is dependent upon higher trade rates from neighbouring countries

Aquest article va ser corregit l’1 de juliol de 2014. La correcció es va publicar a Biology Letters, 2014, vol. 10, núm. 7, p. 20140504

V.M. and C.G. received support from MICINN (CGL2010-16451), N.R-P. from MICINN (CSD2008-00040) and R.R.D. from US DOE PER (DE-FG02-08ER64510), NASA Biodiversity (ROSES-NNX09AK22G) and NSF Career (0953390) grants

© Biology Letters, 2014, vol. 10, núm. 8, p. 20140518

http://hdl.handle.net/10256/11933 http://hdl.handle.net/10256/13676

The Royal Society

Author: Miravete, Verònica
Roura i Pascual, Núria
Dunn, Robert R
Gómez López, Crisanto
Date: 2014 August 20
Abstract: Human transportation facilitates the dispersal of exotic ants, but few studies have quantified the magnitude and geography of these movements. We used several non-parametric indices to estimate the number of species successfully introduced to or established in new regions. We also compared their source biogeographic realms to assess the importance of geographical origin in determining the likelihood of establishment after introduction. Occurrence data on exotic ants derive from studies of three temperate regions. Our results suggest that the numbers of introduced or established ants may be much larger than the numbers so far documented. Ants introduced or established in new regions tend to arrive from the same or neighbouring realms, as would be expected if exotic species tend to match climates and if arrival/establishment is dependent upon higher trade rates from neighbouring countries
Aquest article va ser corregit l’1 de juliol de 2014. La correcció es va publicar a Biology Letters, 2014, vol. 10, núm. 7, p. 20140504
V.M. and C.G. received support from MICINN (CGL2010-16451), N.R-P. from MICINN (CSD2008-00040) and R.R.D. from US DOE PER (DE-FG02-08ER64510), NASA Biodiversity (ROSES-NNX09AK22G) and NSF Career (0953390) grants
Format: application/pdf
ISSN: 1744-9561 (versió paper)
1744-957X (versió electrònica)
Document access: http://hdl.handle.net/10256/13677
Language: eng
Publisher: The Royal Society
Collection: MEC/PN 2011-2013/CGL2010-16451
Reproducció digital del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2014.0518
Articles publicats (D-CCAA)
Is part of: © Biology Letters, 2014, vol. 10, núm. 8, p. 20140518
See also: http://hdl.handle.net/10256/11933
http://hdl.handle.net/10256/13676
Rights: Tots els drets reservats
Subject: Invasions biològiques
Biological invasions
Animals invasors
Introduced organisms
Espècies introduïdes
Title: How many and which ant species are being accidentally moved around the world?
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Repository: DUGiDocs

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