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Influences on Facial Emotion Recognition in Deaf Children

This exploratory research is aimed at studying facial emotion recognition abilities in deaf children and how they relate to linguistic skills and the characteristics of deafness. A total of 166 participants (75 deaf) aged 3–8 years were administered the following tasks: facial emotion recognition, naming vocabulary and cognitive ability. The children’s teachers or speech therapists also responded to two questionnaires, one on children’s linguistic-communicative skills and the other providing personal information. Results show a delay in deaf children’s capacity to recognize some emotions (scared, surprised, and disgusted) but not others (happy, sad, and angry). Notably, they recognized emotions in a similar order to hearing children. Moreover, linguistic skills were found to be related to emotion recognition skills, even when controlling for age. We discuss the importance of facial emotion recognition of language, conversation, some characteristics of deafness, and parents’ educational level

This work was supported by the grant Programa Estatal de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación Orientada a los Retos de la Sociedad (PSI2015-69419-R) of the Spanish Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad

© Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2017, vol. 22, núm. 2, p. 164-177

Oxford University Press

Author: Sidera Caballero, Francesc
Amadó Codony, Anna
Martínez, Laura
Date: 2016 December 7
Abstract: This exploratory research is aimed at studying facial emotion recognition abilities in deaf children and how they relate to linguistic skills and the characteristics of deafness. A total of 166 participants (75 deaf) aged 3–8 years were administered the following tasks: facial emotion recognition, naming vocabulary and cognitive ability. The children’s teachers or speech therapists also responded to two questionnaires, one on children’s linguistic-communicative skills and the other providing personal information. Results show a delay in deaf children’s capacity to recognize some emotions (scared, surprised, and disgusted) but not others (happy, sad, and angry). Notably, they recognized emotions in a similar order to hearing children. Moreover, linguistic skills were found to be related to emotion recognition skills, even when controlling for age. We discuss the importance of facial emotion recognition of language, conversation, some characteristics of deafness, and parents’ educational level
This work was supported by the grant Programa Estatal de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación Orientada a los Retos de la Sociedad (PSI2015-69419-R) of the Spanish Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad
Format: application/pdf
Citation: https://doi.org/10.1093/deafed/enw072
ISSN: 1081-4159 (versió paper)
1465-7325 (versió electrònica)
Document access: http://hdl.handle.net/10256/14117
Language: eng
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Collection: MINECO/PE 2016-2018/PSI2015-69419-R
Reproducció digital del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1093/deafed/enw072
Articles publicats (D-PS)
Is part of: © Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2017, vol. 22, núm. 2, p. 164-177
Rights: Tots els drets reservats
Subject: Infants sords -- Psicologia
Deaf children -- Psychology
Expressió facial
Facial expression
Emocions i cognició
Emotions and cognition
Title: Influences on Facial Emotion Recognition in Deaf Children
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Repository: DUGiDocs

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