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Global hotspots and correlates of alien species richness across taxonomic groups

Human-mediated transport beyond biogeographic barriers has led to the introduction and establishment of alien species in new regions worldwide. However, we lack a global picture of established alien species richness for multiple taxonomic groups. Here, we assess global patterns and potential drivers of established alien species richness across eight taxonomic groups (amphibians, ants, birds, freshwater fishes, mammals, vascular plants, reptiles and spiders) for 186 islands and 423 mainland regions. Hotspots of established alien species richness are predominantly island and coastal mainland regions. Regions with greater gross domestic product per capita, human population density, and area have higher established alien richness, with strongest effects emerging for islands. Ants and reptiles, birds and mammals, and vascular plants and spiders form pairs of taxonomic groups with the highest spatial congruence in established alien richness, but drivers explaining richness differ between the taxa in each pair. Across all taxonomic groups, our results highlight the need to prioritize prevention of further alien species introductions to island and coastal mainland regions globally

This research benefited from support from the European Commission (COST Action TD1209). The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft supported H.S. (DFG, grant SE 1891/2-1), M.v.K. (KL 1866/9-1) and M.W. (FZT 118), the Austrian Science Foundation supported F.E., B.L. and D.M. (FWF, grant I2086-B16). P.P. and J.P. were supported by the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (no. RVO 67985939), Praemium Academiae award to P.P. and Czech Science Foundation (project no. 14-36079G). C. Capinha was supported by a postdoctoral grant from the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT/MCTES) and POPH/FSE (EC) grant SFRH/BPD/84422/2012. E.G.-B. was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (projects CGL2013-43822-R and CGL2015-69311-REDT)

© Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2017, vol. 1, p. 0186

http://hdl.handle.net/10256/14948

Nature Publishing Group

Manager: Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (Espanya)
Author: Dawson, Wayne
Moser, Dietmar
Kleunen, Mark van
Kreft, Holger
Pergl, Jan
Pyšek, Petr
Weigelt, Patrick
Winter, Marten
Lenzner, Bernd
Blackburn, Tim M.
Dyer, Ellie E.
Cassey, Phillip
Scrivens, Sally L.
Economo, Evan P.
Guénard, Benoit
Capinha, César
Seebens, Hanno
García-Díaz, Pablo
Nentwig, Wolfgang
García-Berthou, Emili
Casal, Christine
Mandrak, Nicholas E.
Fuller, Pam
Meyer, Carsten
Essl, Franz
Date: 2017 June 12
Abstract: Human-mediated transport beyond biogeographic barriers has led to the introduction and establishment of alien species in new regions worldwide. However, we lack a global picture of established alien species richness for multiple taxonomic groups. Here, we assess global patterns and potential drivers of established alien species richness across eight taxonomic groups (amphibians, ants, birds, freshwater fishes, mammals, vascular plants, reptiles and spiders) for 186 islands and 423 mainland regions. Hotspots of established alien species richness are predominantly island and coastal mainland regions. Regions with greater gross domestic product per capita, human population density, and area have higher established alien richness, with strongest effects emerging for islands. Ants and reptiles, birds and mammals, and vascular plants and spiders form pairs of taxonomic groups with the highest spatial congruence in established alien richness, but drivers explaining richness differ between the taxa in each pair. Across all taxonomic groups, our results highlight the need to prioritize prevention of further alien species introductions to island and coastal mainland regions globally
This research benefited from support from the European Commission (COST Action TD1209). The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft supported H.S. (DFG, grant SE 1891/2-1), M.v.K. (KL 1866/9-1) and M.W. (FZT 118), the Austrian Science Foundation supported F.E., B.L. and D.M. (FWF, grant I2086-B16). P.P. and J.P. were supported by the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (no. RVO 67985939), Praemium Academiae award to P.P. and Czech Science Foundation (project no. 14-36079G). C. Capinha was supported by a postdoctoral grant from the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT/MCTES) and POPH/FSE (EC) grant SFRH/BPD/84422/2012. E.G.-B. was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (projects CGL2013-43822-R and CGL2015-69311-REDT)
Format: application/pdf
Citation: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-017-0186
ISSN: 2397-334X
Document access: http://hdl.handle.net/10256/14947
Language: eng
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Collection: MINECO/PE 2014-2016/CGL2013-43822-R
MINECO/PE 2015-2017/CGL2015-69311-REDT
Versió postprint del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-017-0186
Articles publicats (D-CCAA)
Is part of: © Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2017, vol. 1, p. 0186
See also: http://hdl.handle.net/10256/14948
Subject: Biogeografia
Biogeography
Espècies introduïdes
Introduced organisms
Title: Global hotspots and correlates of alien species richness across taxonomic groups
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Repository: DUGiDocs

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