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Population spread and cultural transmission in Neolithic transitions

ocial Simulation Conference (2014 : Barcelona, Spain). Proceedings of the Social Simulation Conference held at Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain), September 1­5, 2014: 10th Artificial Economics Conference AE10th Conference of the European Social Simulation association ESSA 1st Simulating the Past to Understand Human History SPUHH

The classical wave-of-advance model is based on Fisher’s equation. However, this approach leads to an unbounded wave-of-advance speed at high reproduction rates. In contrast, an integro-difference model leads to a finite upper bound for the speed, namely the maximum dispersal distance divided by the generation time. Intuitively, this is a very reasonable result. This demic model has been generalized to include cultural transmission (Fort, PNAS 2012). We apply this recent demic-cultural model to determine the percentages of demic and cultural diffusion in the Neolithic transition for two case studies: (i) Europe, and (ii) southern Africa (Jerardino et al., submitted 2014). The similarities and differences between both case studies are interpreted in terms of the three mechanisms at work (population reproduction, dispersal and acculturation)

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Laboratori d’Arqueologia Quantitativa

Author: Fort, Joaquim
Isern Sardó, Neus
Jeradino, Antonieta
Rondelli, Bernardo
Date: 2018 June 5
Abstract: ocial Simulation Conference (2014 : Barcelona, Spain). Proceedings of the Social Simulation Conference held at Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain), September 1­5, 2014: 10th Artificial Economics Conference AE10th Conference of the European Social Simulation association ESSA 1st Simulating the Past to Understand Human History SPUHH
The classical wave-of-advance model is based on Fisher’s equation. However, this approach leads to an unbounded wave-of-advance speed at high reproduction rates. In contrast, an integro-difference model leads to a finite upper bound for the speed, namely the maximum dispersal distance divided by the generation time. Intuitively, this is a very reasonable result. This demic model has been generalized to include cultural transmission (Fort, PNAS 2012). We apply this recent demic-cultural model to determine the percentages of demic and cultural diffusion in the Neolithic transition for two case studies: (i) Europe, and (ii) southern Africa (Jerardino et al., submitted 2014). The similarities and differences between both case studies are interpreted in terms of the three mechanisms at work (population reproduction, dispersal and acculturation)
Document access: http://hdl.handle.net/2072/320220
Language: eng
Publisher: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Laboratori d’Arqueologia Quantitativa
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain
Rights URI: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
Subject: Neolític -- Models matemàtics
Neolithic period -- Mathematical models
Equacions de reacció-difusió
Reaction-diffusion equations
Title: Population spread and cultural transmission in Neolithic transitions
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Repository: Recercat

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