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Bioaccumulation and trophic magnification of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in a Mediterranean river food web

Increasing evidence exists that emerging pollutants such as pharmaceuticals (PhACs) and endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) can be bioaccumulated by aquatic organisms. However, the relative role of trophic transfers in the acquisition of emerging pollutants by aquatic organisms remains largely unexplored. In freshwater ecosystems, wastewater treatment plants are a major source of PhACs and EDCs. Here we studied the entrance of emerging pollutants and their flow through riverine food webs in an effluent-influenced river. To this end we assembled a data set on the composition and concentrations of a broad spectrum of PhACs (25 compounds) and EDCs (12 compounds) in water, biofilm, and three aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa with different trophic positions and feeding strategies (Ancylus fluviatilis, Hydropsyche sp., Phagocata vitta). We tested for similarities in pollutant levels among these compartments, and we compared observed bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) to those predicted by a previously-developed empirical model based on octanol-water distribution coefficients (Dow). Despite a high variation in composition and levels of emerging pollutants across food web compartments, observed BAFs in Hydropsyche and Phagocata matched, on average, those already predicted. Three compounds (the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac, the lipid regulator gemfibrozil, and the flame retardant TBEP) were detected in water, biofilm and (at least) one macroinvertebrate taxa. TBEP was the only compound present in all taxa and showed magnification across trophic levels. This suggests that prey consumption may be, in some cases, a significant exposure route. This study advances the notion that both waterborne exposure and trophic interactions need to be taken into account when assessing the potential ecological risks of emerging pollutants in aquatic ecosystems

This study has been financially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through the SCARCE project (Consolider-Ingenio 2010 CSD2009-00065), and by the Economy and Knowledge Department of the Catalan Government (Consolidated Research Group 2014 SGR 291—ICRA

© Science of the Total Environment, 2015, vol. 540, p. 250-259

Elsevier

Author: Ruhí i Vidal, Albert
Acuña i Salazar, Vicenç
Barceló i Cullerés, Damià
Huerta Buitrago, Belinda
Mor, Jordi Rene
Rodríguez Mozaz, Sara
Sabater, Sergi
Date: 2016 January 1
Abstract: Increasing evidence exists that emerging pollutants such as pharmaceuticals (PhACs) and endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) can be bioaccumulated by aquatic organisms. However, the relative role of trophic transfers in the acquisition of emerging pollutants by aquatic organisms remains largely unexplored. In freshwater ecosystems, wastewater treatment plants are a major source of PhACs and EDCs. Here we studied the entrance of emerging pollutants and their flow through riverine food webs in an effluent-influenced river. To this end we assembled a data set on the composition and concentrations of a broad spectrum of PhACs (25 compounds) and EDCs (12 compounds) in water, biofilm, and three aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa with different trophic positions and feeding strategies (Ancylus fluviatilis, Hydropsyche sp., Phagocata vitta). We tested for similarities in pollutant levels among these compartments, and we compared observed bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) to those predicted by a previously-developed empirical model based on octanol-water distribution coefficients (Dow). Despite a high variation in composition and levels of emerging pollutants across food web compartments, observed BAFs in Hydropsyche and Phagocata matched, on average, those already predicted. Three compounds (the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac, the lipid regulator gemfibrozil, and the flame retardant TBEP) were detected in water, biofilm and (at least) one macroinvertebrate taxa. TBEP was the only compound present in all taxa and showed magnification across trophic levels. This suggests that prey consumption may be, in some cases, a significant exposure route. This study advances the notion that both waterborne exposure and trophic interactions need to be taken into account when assessing the potential ecological risks of emerging pollutants in aquatic ecosystems
This study has been financially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through the SCARCE project (Consolider-Ingenio 2010 CSD2009-00065), and by the Economy and Knowledge Department of the Catalan Government (Consolidated Research Group 2014 SGR 291—ICRA
Format: application/pdf
ISSN: 0048-9697
Document access: http://hdl.handle.net/10256/12572
Language: eng
Publisher: Elsevier
Collection: MICINN/PN 2009-2014/CSD2009-00065
Reproducció digital del document publicat a: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.06.009
Articles publicats (D-CCAA)
Is part of: © Science of the Total Environment, 2015, vol. 540, p. 250-259
Rights: Tots els drets reservats
Subject: Aigua -- Contaminació
Water -- Pollution
Disruptors endocrins
Endocrine disrupting chemicals
Contaminants
Pollutants
Contaminants emergents en l’aigua
Emerging contaminants in water
Organismes aquàtics -- Efecte dels medicaments
Aquatic organisms -- Effect of drugs on
Organismes aquàtics -- Efecte dels productes químics
Aquatic organisms -- Effect of chemicals on
Title: Bioaccumulation and trophic magnification of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in a Mediterranean river food web
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Repository: DUGiDocs

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